The Porsche 911 Targa from the 70s at the Price of the Flagship Maserati

Features of the Porsche 911 Targa that you might not have known about. We reveal the secrets of the model, which was produced for only three years - from 1971 to 1973.

Such a Porsche 911 Targa was assembled at the factory for only three years – from 1971 to 1973. “Wait a minute”, you might say, “but the first 911 didn't have a new car generation until 1989! Why was it only manufactured for three years, if there is a typical classic 911 in the photo?”

This Porsche 911 Targa was produced only in 1971-1973 This Porsche 911 Targa was produced only in 1971-1973

Differences between the first-gen Porsches 911 of various years

The both statements are true. The cars had the same body from 1964 to 1989 but the cars of 1964 and 1989 are actually radically different from each other. So, throughout the entire life cycle of the model, it underwent a lot of various improvements. Today we are going to speak about the models of 1971-1973, which are still called E- and F-series.

The Porsche 911 Targa from the 70s at the Price of the Flagship Maserati photo 2

The list of models has not changed in comparison with the previous specification of 1970s. The standard model was the T model (which you can see in the photo), then there was the E model and the flagship – the S model. Visually, the updated car can only be distinguished by a neat spoiler under the front bumper. The spoiler made it possible to achieve better stability at high speeds. But it was not installed on all models — the basic configuration did not have it (the white 911 in the photos is just the basic one).

This is how the spoiler looked like with the more expensive configurations of the Porsche 911 This is how the spoiler looked like with the more expensive configurations of the Porsche 911

Engines

The engine for all models was the same one — it was an updated 2341-cc six- cylinder engine, better known as the 2.4 L. Despite its greater logical proximity to the 2.3 designation, some fans of the brand suggest that this step was intentional. They say that the company wanted to focus more on increasing the volume of the power unit compared to the 2.2-liter engine, which was installed in the models of 1970s. The T model had two configurations — 97 kW/130 hp and 104 kW/140 hp. The E model was slightly more powerful-123 kW/165 hp. The top-end S model had very powerful characteristics for a small sports car weighing 1050 kg — 142 kW/190 hp.

The E-and F-series were equipped with a single 2.3-liter engine in different power options - from 130 to 190 hp The E-and F-series were equipped with a single 2.3-liter engine in different power options - from 130 to 190 hp

It is very interesting that the E and S models had the Bosch mechanical fuel injection (MFI) in all markets. But the basic T model was sold with a carburetor everywhere except the US. Thus, the basic configurations for each market could have differing by 7 kW/9 hp power. In January 1973, the American T model was equipped with the more advanced K-Jetronic sequential injection system (CIS), which was not widespread in other markets. These cars referred to as the «1973.5» models among the fans.

This MFI power system by Bosch was installed only in 1300 copies of the 1973 Porsche 911 This MFI power system by Bosch was installed only in 1300 copies of the 1973 Porsche 911

Transmission

The increased power of the engines led to the modernization of the transmission, which was quite substantial. The 5-speed manual transmission of the 1971-1973 models was strengthened and built on the basis of the unit from the Porsche 908 racing car. It received the designation 915, thus finally saying goodbye to the 901/911 transmissions. A feature of the latter was an unusual up-over-up shift between first and second gear. This switching scheme is also called «a dog-leg gearbox». The new gearbox had the usual for today shift between first and second gear. Someone is sure that it was very inconvenient to have the 901/911 gearboxes while driving in the city. Others think that such a step made it possible to make fifth gear out of the gearbox casing. This, in turn, helped to resolve the issue with its replacement for different types of competitions. Among the options was the unusual semi-automatic Sportomatic gearbox, in which there was no clutch pedal but gears were shifted manually.

Take a look! This is a famous dog-leg gearbox schemeIn 1971, the 5-speed manual transmission of the Porsche 911 received the now familiar gearshift pattern

An unfortunate solution to the big problem of the Porsche 911

Besides, Porsche decided to eliminate the oversteering problem of the E and F models. After all, the light sports car with a heavy engine began to literally spin on the spot in the hands of an inexperienced driver (perhaps those, who have ever played the computer game NFS: Porsche Unleashed, experienced this feature in the simulator). The company decided to move the oil tank to another place in order to fix this design feature. Thus, an 8.5-liter oil tank, which previously stood behind the rear wheel, was installed in front of it. Accordingly, a hole was cut for the oil filling hatch. But it didn't work out. After all, many filling station attendants, believing that this was a gas hatch, boldly poured the fuel there. After only one year of production (1972), the tank was moved to its old place. But the question of oversteering was solved only in the completely new 964 body.

You can clearly see the hatch on the seemingly familiar place of the fuel tank hatch of the Porsche 911 Targa in this photo. But this is not it… You can clearly see the hatch on the seemingly familiar place of the fuel tank hatch of the Porsche 911 Targa in this photo. But this is not it…

Limited edition Porsche 911 ST

Porsche tried not to forget about sports configurations. For example, a limited series of the 911 ST was released with a lightweight body of up to 960 kg and a slightly larger engine: with either 2466 cc or 2492 cc volume but the same power output of 266 hp and 8000 rpm. Such cars performed quite effectively in various racing championships, e.g. the 6 Hours of Daytona, the 12 Hours of Sebring, the Nurburgring 1000 km and the Targa Florio 1000 km.

It is said to be impossible to find two identical Porsche 911 ST, as buyers of these models had unimaginable possibilities for customizationThe Porsche 911 Targa from the 70s at the Price of the Flagship Maserati photo 3

The story of a 1973 Porsche 911 Targa

What kind of car is shown in most of the photos in this article? In fact, this is the most common for that time Porsche 911 2.4 T Targa. But, unlike most other retro cars, the history of its purchase is known literally to the smallest nuances. The first owner of the car was a certain Robert S. Baller, who had just returned from the Vietnam War. That is when he decided to buy a new car. He was buying very meticulously, carefully choosing both the Porsche model and its equipment.

The Porsche 911 Targa from the 70s at the Price of the Flagship Maserati photo 4The Porsche 911 Targa from the 70s at the Price of the Flagship Maserati photo 5The Porsche 911 Targa from the 70s at the Price of the Flagship Maserati photo 6The Porsche 911 Targa from the 70s at the Price of the Flagship Maserati photo 7The Porsche 911 Targa from the 70s at the Price of the Flagship Maserati photo 8

As a result, the coupe was additionally equipped with the Comfort Group package, including Fuchs discs, a Blaupunkt AM/FM radio, as well as an air conditioning system that was rare for that time. Light Ivory paint with black leather interior was ordered separately. After having fulfilled all the customer's wishes, Peoria Hills-based Gardner Porsche handed the car to him on February 15 in 1973.

The Porsche 911 2.4 T Targa was driven only for four years, namely from 1973 to 1978. After that, the owner preserved the car, and it remained untouched for 37 years! Only in 2015, Porsche specialists were able to slightly update the car but not to the detriment of its original condition. The car also retained its original paint and interior. In 2015, the car was bought by a collector from southern California, who has a special love for Porsche cars. He doesn’t drive it often, so the car's condition has not changed much since the update. The car has traveled about 34.000 km in total.

We have already mentioned that the MFI system in the basic configurations of the American T model was changed to the CIS one in 1973. So, this 2.4 T Targa, despite being made in 1973, still has the old MFI system. Only 1300 of such cars were released in 1973. The engine is a basic one with a power output130 hp and 6200 rpm. All wheels of the car already have hydraulic brakes, and the suspension is independent torsion bar.

According to the Certificate of Authenticity, all units of the 911 2.4 T Targa are completely original. Moreover, a set of original tools, a jack, an operating manual, extended documentation, various brochures and even a tag on the rear-view mirror come together with the car. This car was sold at auction for $117.600. The top-end configuration of the premium Maserati Levante costs the same!

Technical specifications of the Porsche 911 2.4 T Targa

EngineH6 SOHC
Displacement, cc2341
Fuel feedBosch Mechanical Fuel Injection
Power, hp/rpm130/6200
Transmission5-Speed Manual
The brakesHydraulic disc
SuspensionIndependent torsion bar

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